Saudi Journal for Health Sciences

LETTER TO EDITOR
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 175-

Comments on the “Effectiveness of team-based learning with high fidelity simulation in an undergraduate pediatric course for nurses”


Faizan Zaffar Kashoo1, Mehrunnisha Ahmad2,  
1 Department of Physical Therapy and Health Rehabilitation, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Majmaah University, Majmaah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Nursing, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Majmaah University, Majmaah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Faizan Zaffar Kashoo
Department of Physical Therapy and Health Rehabilitation, Majmaah University, Majmaah, Province Riyadh
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia




How to cite this article:
Kashoo FZ, Ahmad M. Comments on the “Effectiveness of team-based learning with high fidelity simulation in an undergraduate pediatric course for nurses”.Saudi J Health Sci 2020;9:175-175


How to cite this URL:
Kashoo FZ, Ahmad M. Comments on the “Effectiveness of team-based learning with high fidelity simulation in an undergraduate pediatric course for nurses”. Saudi J Health Sci [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Oct 31 ];9:175-175
Available from: https://www.saudijhealthsci.org/text.asp?2020/9/2/175/290320


Full Text



We read with interest the research article titled “Effectiveness of team-based learning with high fidelity simulation in an undergraduate pediatric course for nurses” by Najjar published in the Saudi Journal of Health Sciences.[1] The study included 81 college-going female students divided randomly into two groups. All the students were involved in team-based learning with the addition of high-fidelity simulation to the experimental group. The outcome measures were academic grades, academic tests, and questionnaires. Although the study is plausible and complete in every manner, we would like to add some important points that would improve the impact of the article as well as guide future research.

First, the assessment of the intelligence quotient is essential to ensure that there is no statistically significant difference at baseline between the two groups. Second, there might be a huge variation among students regarding the number of extra hours spent outside the classroom. Therefore, students who spend more time studying are more likely to score higher than the other students in the same class. Third, students are under constant stress during their academic years; such situations may sometime lead to the development of anxiety, depression,[2] and eating disorders such as night eating syndrome.[3],[4] Stringent inclusion and exclusion criteria during inception will ensure that the outcome is not influenced by these confounding factors. Fourth, the inclusion of regression analysis between the questionnaire assessing the perception about high-fidelity simulation and academic grades would have improved the impact of the article by reporting the agreement between these two dependent variables.

In conclusion, team-based learning with simulation is the best platform to practice among novice nursing students to practice invasive techniques with no risk to harm a patient. However, we must also realize that it should not completely replace the real clinical experience.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

1Al Najjar H. Effectiveness of team-based learning with high fidelity simulation in an undergraduate pediatric course for nurses. Saudi J Health Sci 2020;9:12.
2Inam SB. Anxiety and depression among students of a medical college in Saudi Arabia. Int J Health Sci (Qassim) 2007;1:295-300.
3Ahmad M, Kashoo FZ, Alqahtani M, Sami W, Rizvi M, Bushra A. Relation between night eating syndrome and academic grades among university students. Turkish J Endocrinol Metab 2019;23:85-91.
4Naji E, Kashoo FZ, Kashoo M. Prevalence of obesity and overweight among Majmaah University Students. Indian J Physiother Occup Ther 2013;7:41.