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CASE REPORT
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 124-126

Malignant phyllodes tumor with osteoclastic giant cells


Department of Pathology, ESIC Medical College and PGIMSR, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
B R Vani
Department of Pathology, ESIC Medical College and PGIMSR, Rajajinagar, Bengaluru, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2278-0521.134868

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Phyllodes tumor (PT) is uncommon biphasic epithelial tumors with exaggerated stromal cellularity, accounting for 0.3-0.9% of primary breast tumors. Malignant PT (MPT) is a rare and potentially aggressive breast neoplasm. Histologically has fibrosarcomatous type of stroma and rarely heterologous mesenchymal differentiation. MPT with osteoclastic giant cells is even rarer, which can be confused for primary malignant fibrous histiocytoma and metaplastic carcinoma. Herein, authors present a 51 year female who presented with right breast mass, clinically and cytological diagnosed as carcinoma of the breast. Histopathology and added immunohistochemistry enabled in arriving at a final definitive diagnosis of MPT with osteoclast giant cells. The diagnosis of this distinct entity is of importance due to their better prognostic implication.


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