Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
    Users Online: 196
Home Print this page Email this page Small font size Default font size Increase font size
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 54-59

Knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward self-medication in a rural population in South-Western Saudi Arabia


1 Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Jazan University, Jizan, Saudi Arabia
2 Pharmacy Practice Research Unit, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Jazan University, Jizan, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Otilia J.F Banji
Pharmacy Practice Research Unit, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Jazan University, Jizan
Saudi Arabia
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/sjhs.sjhs_9_19

Rights and Permissions

Aim: Self-medication is developed to encourage responsible self-care but is often carried out without sound rationality. This study assesses the reasons, knowledge, attitude, and practices toward self-medication in rural areas of south-western Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive, and questionnaire-based study was carried out on respondents visiting the primary healthcare center. Data were collected, analyzed using SPSS software version 23 and presented as frequencies and percentage. Association between variables was established using the Chi-square test, and logistic regression. Results: Among the 500 responses obtained, 58% were female, and 42% were male. Self-medication was practiced for pain (38.3%), influenza (26.3%), cough (24%), and allergy (11.4%). Over 70% failed to consult a physician, lacked awareness of medicine information inserts (71.06%), and failed to check the expiration date (85.2%). Recurrence of symptoms and accessibility of medicines in pharmacies or online stores were a widely accepted reason for self-medication. The respondents were 2.5 times likely to use medications based on others recommendations (odds ratio [OR]: 2.56; 95% of confidence interval [CI]: 1.59–4.13); however, this was lower in females (OR: 0.55; 95% CI: 0.38–0.79; P = 0.002). A significant association was observed between the reasons for self-medication and practices undertaken if symptoms persist with demographic characteristics. Conclusion: Recurrence of symptoms, adopting others advice, the absence of information about medication inserts, and expiration date were issues that can impede responsible self-medication in rural areas. Appropriate patient counseling and conscious dispensing of medications are needed to minimize risks associated with self-medication.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed39    
    Printed0    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded8    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal