Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
    Users Online: 701
Home Print this page Email this page Small font size Default font size Increase font size
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 113-117

Prevalence of HIV, HBV, and HCV infections among pregnant women receiving antenatal care in a traditional birth home in Benin City, Nigeria


1 Department of Medical Microbiology, College of Health Sciences, Igbinedion University, Okada, Edo State, Nigeria
2 Department of Medical Microbiology, School of Medical Laboratory Sciences, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria
3 Department of Obstetrics and Gyneocology, Irrua Specialist Hospital, Irrua, Edo State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Bankole Henry Oladeinde
Department of Medical Microbiology, College of Health Sciences, Igbinedion University, Okada, Edo State
Nigeria
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2278-0521.117916

Rights and Permissions

Background: Data on prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections among pregnant women in non-institutionalized health facilities in Nigeria are missing. Aim: This study aimed at determining the prevalence and associated risk factors of HIV, HBV, and HCV infections among pregnant women receiving antenatal care in a traditional birth home in Nigeria. Setting and Design: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in a traditional birth home. Materials and Methods: Blood and sera samples obtained from 360 pregnant women were tested for the presence of HIV, HBV, and HCV antibodies and hemoglobin concentration determined using standard technique. Questionnaires were used to obtain demographic information. Statistical Analysis: INSTAT ® statistical software. Results: The prevalence of HIV infection was significantly higher among pregnant women with no formal education and among those with multiple marriages (P = 0.008 and P = <0.0001 respectively). Only HIV infection was associated with anemia (OR = 4.154, 95% CI = 1.699, 10.157, P = 0.002). Age, gravidity, parity, marital status, history of blood transfusion, and educational status did not significantly affect the prevalence of HBV and HCV infections. Conclusions: The prevalence of HIV, HBV, and HCV infections were 7.2%, 2.2%, and 0.8%, respectively. Anemia was significantly associated with HIV infection only. Intervention effort at reducing HIV, HBV, and HCV infections and associated sequelae among pregnant women receiving antenatal care in traditional birth homes is strongly advocated.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed3726    
    Printed108    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded466    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 5    

Recommend this journal